ADAPTABILITY AND REPLICABILITY OF WEB-FACILITATED, HYBRID, AND ONLINE LEARNING IN AN UNDERGRADUATE EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY COURSE

 

ABSTRACT

The study aims to examine the effectiveness of web-facilitated, hybrid, and online learning modalities among undergraduate students in a public institution so as to determine the adaptability and replicability of these three learning modalities. This is a quasi-experimental study. A total of 103 undergraduate exercise science majors participated in the study. Students learning outcomes were measured by mid-term exams, final exams, online journal entries, final course grades, and other in-class and online assignments, and compared among the web-facilitated, hybrid, and online course sections. The differences of the means of the three sections of the final exam, final course grade, and final letter grade were statistically significant. The mean scores of the final exam of the web-facilitated section were significantly higher than the means of both the hybrid and online sections. The means of the final course grade and final letter grade of the web-facilitated section were significantly higher than the means of the online section. Approximately 82.1% of the students in the web-facilitated section earned extra credits compared to about 37.5% of the students in the online section. Web-facilitated learning proved more desirable among undergraduate students than the other two modalities; hybrid learning, however, can serve as a viable alternative.